Observations from the ground.

Flat City Field Notes is a blog offering reviews, essays and criticism about arts and culture in and around Ōtautahi Christchurch, Aotearoa New Zealand.

Latest Posts

Review: Ariā I and II – voices of longing, absence and connection

Erin Harrington responds to Ariā, created and performed by Juanita Hepi (Kāi Tahu, Ngāti Wai, Moriori, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāpuhi), with artistic direction from Julia Harvie, from 2-245pm on Saturday 22 January 2022 at the installation Isolation Hotel at Canterbury Museum. Multidisciplinary storyteller Juanita Hepi is one of the busiest and most interesting creatives in Ōtautahi.… Continue reading Review: Ariā I and II – voices of longing, absence and connection

Review: The Unauthorised Biography Of… – high energy, sometimes chaotic histories of unsung heroes

Erin Harrington reviews the Court Theatre Youth Company’s devised production of The Unauthorised Biography Of…, directed by William Burns, at the Canterbury Museum, Wednesday 8 December 2021. Set on the ground floor of the Canterbury Museum, Heather Straka’s multi-disciplinary installation, Isolation Hotel, places us inside the foyer of a shabby, run-down German hotel from the… Continue reading Review: The Unauthorised Biography Of… – high energy, sometimes chaotic histories of unsung heroes

Tiny conversations: points of exchange at Tiny Fest 2021

Erin Harrington recaps three discussion-based events at movement arts festival Tiny Fest, which ran from Friday 26 – Saturday 28 November 2021 at Little Andromeda and the Christchurch Town Hall. Tiny Fest in 2021 isn’t really that tiny. The 2019 festival, presented by Movement Art Practice, took place over a single day, starting early and… Continue reading Tiny conversations: points of exchange at Tiny Fest 2021

Review: Little Shop of Horrors – vibrant, camp escapism

Erin Harrington reviews Little Shop of Horrors, directed by Benjamin Henson, at The Court Theatre, Saturday 20 November 2021. Cult sci-fi horror musical Little Shop of Horrors is one of those rare works of musical theatre that’s effectively smash-proof: it’s smart, consistently funny, frequently in circulation, worthy of repeat viewings, and desperately enjoyable. The Court… Continue reading Review: Little Shop of Horrors – vibrant, camp escapism

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